Forum Posts

Clare
Dec 14, 2019
In Unit 6
What an empowering course for teachers! Like the fish thinking nothing of the water (until it’s taken out and shown it!) it seems easy to forget the privileges we take advantage of and how sharing something as mundane as our own career pathway may be life changing for students and their communities. Approaching our students from all walks of life as potential future *whatever-they-want-to-be*s and enriching their lives with examples of varied career options from an early age seems paramount. Popping student x in the “TAFE aka housos“ or “school drop out” box because of their location, socioeconomic status, gender or race seems counter to our work as teachers. Wouldn’t it be great if our school systems were set up to more equitably share the socio-cultural capital and thereby enable the best person for the education/job to get it?
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Clare
Dec 14, 2019
In Unit 5
Wow! I initially thought that students would talk to teach other all the time about occupations, but when looking at the stats and reflecting on my own experience I don’t think we empower and utilise peer groups as well as we could in schools. The chance encounters- some of which were one-off experiences leaving massive impressions- makes me think most schools can use the socio-cultural resources within the community far better too. For example, we have multiple excursions and incursions with a wide variety of community members with a wide variety of occupations. Perhaps including a quick couple of questions about their job and what sorts of pathways need to be taken to get there could be a start.
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Clare
Dec 14, 2019
In Unit 4
This was a dense unit! The break down of data to reveal trends in aspirations that had origins at year 3 (or younger) and life long consequences was astounding. Much of it to do with attributes the child has absolutely no control over: location they live in, race, gender, amount of dosh their parents have access to! It makes you wonder how many Marie Curie‘s or Bruce Pascoes’ we‘ve lost to Woolies and Coles. I also found it interesting that most people looking to become doctors rated themselves as “well above average” for NAPLAN results. It’s a challenging career, no doubt! I do hope my doctors have great knowledge bases, fantastic critical thinking AND the soft skills required in order to treat us lowly patients respectfully.
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Clare
Dec 14, 2019
In Unit 3
I found the drag and drop activity at the beginning fascinating. I certainly have witnessed a shift in interest from medicine/law/teaching careers toward things like YouTube star and games developer with year 5 students I was teaching a while back. I personally find it challenging not to judge the motivations behind these aspirations and found it reassuring for the further of our community that many still aspire to altruistic career paths.
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Clare
Dec 14, 2019
In Unit 2
I can definitely see self concept and gender roles at play when my kindy kids engage in occupational role play, and identify with the cognitive map of aspirations for my own career choice. I absolutely adored the male librarian at Newcastle uni when studying under grad who was covered in tattoos and identified himself as a bibliophile- more exposure to people who break the stereotypes like this may help my students feel confident making choices that suit them best.
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Clare
Nov 22, 2019
In Unit 1
Hello everyone! My name is Clare, and I’m teaching in NSW and the ACT casually while on parental leave. I’m looking forward to finding out how we can help our students move towards their aspirations.
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Clare
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